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Issue #25

SUCCESSFUL BLEND OF NEO-CLASSICISM AND CONTEMPORARY DESIGN

Renovation

The SIGA Guesthouse in Ruswil, Switzerland, was originally built in 1840 as the parish poorhouse and orphanage. Following a successful renovation and extension, the building is now a hotel and training centre. The monolithic brick masonry combines architectural preservation with modern external insulation.
Building: SIGA Guesthouse, Switzerland
©Scheitlin Syfrig Architekten
Building: SIGA Guesthouse, Switzerland
©Scheitlin Syfrig Architekten
Building: SIGA Guesthouse, Switzerland
©Scheitlin Syfrig Architekten
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Building: SIGA Guesthouse, Switzerland
©Scheitlin Syfrig Architekten

SUCCESSFUL BLEND OF NEO-CLASSICISM AND CONTEMPORARY DESIGN

Renovation

The SIGA Guesthouse in Ruswil, Switzerland, was originally built in 1840 as the parish poorhouse and orphanage. Following a successful renovation and extension, the building is now a hotel and training centre. The monolithic brick masonry combines architectural preservation with modern external insulation.

The building, once home to Ruswil’s orphans and the poor, is now used to accommodate guests of the Swiss company. The neo-classical building, constructed in 1840, was extended, reconstructed externally, and finished to a very high standard internally. The guest house gives the company a face: durable quality with an understated appearance. SIGA employees from around the world regularly attend training courses in Ruswil, and the company’s European customers also receive training there. In the past, course attendees had to be split up and stay in various guest houses, but now the new hotel can accommodate them all.

Building: SIGA Guesthouse, Switzerland
©Scheitlin Syfrig Architekten
Building: SIGA Guesthouse, Switzerland
©Scheitlin Syfrig Architekten

External insulation and brick
The strong, robust appearance of the building, with its thick stone walls, was perfectly aligned with the requirements of SIGA – the structural physics were not. Thick external insulation was ruled out because the company wanted to retain the building’s traditional appearance. Instead, hollow masonry bricks filled with perlite to offer built-in insulation were chosen for the renovation. The upper floors of the building were removed and rebuilt on top of the original ground floor, using the filled monolithic bricks.

Building: SIGA Guesthouse, Switzerland
©Scheitlin Syfrig Architekten

Extension creates more space
In order to fit 75 guest rooms into the hotel, the building was extended on its narrow side, with a design that reflects the strong geometric form and the rhythm of the original building. The deep window recesses, the stone walls, the large gable roof, and the materials used, are all in keeping with the traditional appearance of the building and allow visitors to feel its history. On the ground floor, there are semi-public rooms such as the reception area, event room, and the building’s restored chapel; the five upper floors house the guest rooms and a staff room. The renovation and extension have considerably enhanced the building and it now meets all modern standards

Facts
  • Project name
    SIGA Guesthouse, Ruswil, Switzerland
  • Architect
    Scheitlin Syfrig Architekten
  • Client
    Siga Services AG
  • Used products

    Porotherm T8

  • Year of completion
    2014
Porotherm T8

Wall

Porotherm T8 – Switzerland