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Issue #22

HISTORICAL STRUCTURE TAKES ON A NEW GUISE – INDIVIDUAL ROOF TILES

Historic Renovation

The comprehensive renovation of the former Capuchin cloister in Dillingen, Germany, can be described as a significant restoration project that clearly respects the building’s historical roots. Handcrafted roof tiles were produced especially for this 300-year-old building.
© Sienz, Kempten
© Sienz, Kempten
© Sienz, Kempten
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© Sienz, Kempten

HISTORICAL STRUCTURE TAKES ON A NEW GUISE – INDIVIDUAL ROOF TILES

Historic Renovation

The comprehensive renovation of the former Capuchin cloister in Dillingen, Germany, can be described as a significant restoration project that clearly respects the building’s historical roots. Handcrafted roof tiles were produced especially for this 300-year-old building.

The Capuchin cloister was built between 1695 and 1699. The cloister and the accompanying estate have been in possession of the state since 1803. In October 1991, the Capuchin order abandoned the site in Dillinger. With the exception of “Guest house C”, located at the southern end of the estate, the buildings subsequently fell into disuse. Guest house C however, was used for seminars. Following the renovation work, this continues to be the case today. The renovation has meant that accommodation is now also available for seminar participants.

© Sienz, Kempten

Detailed Design Concept

Throughout the project, Architect Dipl.-Ing. Theodor Merk from the Krumbach State Building Authority (Staatliches Bauamt Krumbach), was responsible for planning the reconstruction and renovation work. The extensive renovation of the estate, which took place from 2010 to 2013, the existing historic structure was dramatically altered but carefully preserved. It was decided that the design concept should maintain a clear separation between the historic structure and any new elements.

© Sienz, Kempten

Visible Additions

All new additions to the building are made of exposed concrete. This deliberate choice means that any changes or additions to the historic structure are quite visible. The original historic annexes for example, have been replaced with new cubic structures. The same goes for the gates added to the south of the church, and the kitchen extension. Two new flights of stairs now grant access to the upper stories. The original ethos of the Capuchin order; their “self-imposed poverty”, has been reflected in the clean, puritan design of the building. In addition, the materials used, including natural stone and oak furniture and flooring, are of relevance to the region or local area.

© Sienz, Kempten

Individual Beaver Tail Roof Tiles

The renovation work focused both on the exterior of the building and the cloister’s roof. In line with the historic requirements, the roof, which measures a total of 1100 m2, was covered in a double layer of beaver tail roof tiles. Only tiles that were of a comparable size, and had a similar surface appearance to the original roof tiles, could be considered. Following careful consideration, and in order to achieve an authentic look, individually handcrafted beaver tail tiles were selected.

© Sienz, Kempten

Optimal Energy Efficiency

Alongside design aspects, the architect and the Krumbach State Building Authority kept the building’s energy efficiency rating in mind throughout the renovation work. The historic nature of the building means that an energy performance certificate is not required. Despite this, efforts were made to consider the potential, future uses of the building, and so increase its energy efficiency. This was achieved via the addition of a thermal insulation system, triple-glazed windows and the use of a biomass district heating system.

Facts
  • Project name
    Capuchin cloister in Dillingen, Germany
  • Architect
    Theodor Merk, Krumbach State Building Authority
  • Client
    Free State of Bavaria, represented by Krumbach State Building Authority State Ministry for Education and Cultural Affairs
  • Used products

    Handcrafted Koramic brushstroke castle tiles with basket arch, in natural red

  • Year of completion
    2011

Roof

Handcrafted Koramic brushstroke castle tiles with basket arch, in natural red – Germany