Jump to menu Jump to content
ArchivArrowArrow downCloseFacebookFullscreenInstagramLogo TextMagnifierMinusNextNumberOverviewPinterestPrevQuote 1Quote 2Social MediaShareTwitterUpdatesWienerberger LogoYouTubeYoutube
Issue #21

COLOURFUL AND SUSTAINABLE CLAY BLOCK WALLS – INSPIRED BY SWEETS

Green building

The colourful walls of Kinderhaus Buntspecht, (“Woodpecker” day care centre for children) in Germany, were built in a monolithic clay block construction; the high thermal insulation qualities of the blocks demonstrate forward-looking energy efficiency without the need for additional insulation layers. The method of construction used updates the benefits of the single leaf wall to enable modern energy-efficient construction. The clay blocks provide a load-bearing block and thermal insulation of the external walls all in one, so that no additional layers of insulation layers are required on either the external or internal walls.
Wienerberger, Kinderhaus Buntsprecht, dbj-Architects © Matthias Rotter
© Matthias Rotter
Wienerberger, Kinderhaus Buntsprecht, dbj-Architects © Matthias Rotter
© Matthias Rotter
Wienerberger, Kinderhaus Buntsprecht, dbj-Architects © Matthias Rotter
© Matthias Rotter
Wienerberger, Kinderhaus Buntsprecht, dbj-Architects © Matthias Rotter
© Matthias Rotter

COLOURFUL AND SUSTAINABLE CLAY BLOCK WALLS – INSPIRED BY SWEETS

Green building

The colourful walls of Kinderhaus Buntspecht, (“Woodpecker” day care centre for children) in Germany, were built in a monolithic clay block construction; the high thermal insulation qualities of the blocks demonstrate forward-looking energy efficiency without the need for additional insulation layers. The method of construction used updates the benefits of the single leaf wall to enable modern energy-efficient construction. The clay blocks provide a load-bearing block and thermal insulation of the external walls all in one, so that no additional layers of insulation layers are required on either the external or internal walls.

LIQUORICE AS AN INSPIRATION

“Of course, the design idea for such a project has to be based on children as the ultimate users,” says djb project manager Matthias Bettmann, describing the origins of the design. “Children love sweets and they love colour, too! So we took our inspiration from liquorice allsorts. The monolithic building mass was visually broken up into individual, coloured, shear walls, between which are vertical cross-storey, dark-coloured, window elements representing the liquorice in the sweet.”

 

Wienerberger, Kinderhaus Buntsprecht, dbj-Architects © Matthias Rotter
© Matthias Rotter

OPTIMIZED BUILDING ENVELOPE

The exterior walls were erected from filled clay blocks 49 and 42.5 cm thick. The lightweight vertically perforated clay blocks filled with mineral wool boast thermal conductivity of A. =0.07 W/mK and can even be used in KfW-efficiency and passive-energy houses for monolithic exterior walls with high thermal insulation. With 49 cm masonry thickness, plus 2 cm of external lightweight render and 1.5 cm lime-gypsum plaster on the inside, a heat transfer value of 0. 14 W/m2K was achieved. The load-bearing interior walls were also built with clay block masonry. They support a healthy indoor climate as high-porosity clay absorbs moisture and heat and gives it off again after a certain delay. For buildings in which children and childcare workers spend time, this is a huge advantage.

The walls support the ceiling over the ground floor as well as the flat roof over the upper storey. This roof closes with concrete fascia running around the entire building, which the designers say has several functions – both in terms of structural requirements and with regard to eliminating thermal bridges.

Wienerberger, Kinderhaus Buntsprecht, dbj-Architects © Matthias Rotter
© Matthias Rotter
Wienerberger, Kinderhaus Buntsprecht, dbj-Architects © Matthias Rotter
© Matthias Rotter
Wienerberger, Kinderhaus Buntsprecht, dbj-Architects © Matthias Rotter
© Matthias Rotter
Wienerberger, Kinderhaus Buntsprecht, dbj-Architects © Matthias Rotter
© Matthias Rotter

SPACE FOR CHILDREN

The net floor area of 1,280 m2 accommodates a layout with a total of five group rooms for a crib, nursery and day care centre, plus a sports room, two sleeping areas, a crafts room and a staff area.

Facts & Figures
  • Project name
    Kinderhaus Buntsprecht, Spardorf, Germany
  • Architect
    dbj-Architects
  • Client
    Spardorf council
  • Used products

    Poroton T7-MW

  • Year of completion
    2014
Schlagmann_Poroton_T7, T8

Wall

Poroton T7 – Germany